The application notice for The Jack Henning Graduate Fellowship in Labor Culture and History for 2018-2019 will be available during September of 2017.

Click here for the 2018-2019 announcement.

In 2009 the award was presented to Alex Johnston (UCSC, Community Studies) whose dissertation “Remember the Work: Remember the Worker: Blue Collar Preservation” and the film “Way Down in the Hole” provides us with a visceral exploration of the Great Colorado Coalfield War and the infamous Ludlow Massacre.

Kyle Arnone (UCLA, Sociology), our 2010 recipient, researched a unique case of workers’ self-organization among "independent-contractor" port truck drivers in Southern California.

Elizabeth Sine (UCSD, History) is awarded the Jack Henning Graduate Fellowship for 2011-12. Elizabeth's dissertation is entitled: "Movements on the Margins: An Archaeology of Struggles for Survival and Dignity in Depression-Era California".

Janette Diaz (UCSB, Sociology) has received our fellowship grant for 2012-2013 for her dissertation about department store retail workers' struggle for autonomy and occupational mobility in Central California.

Christian Paiz (USC History) is the 2013-2014 recipient of the fellowship grant. His research is on Southern California's Coachella Valley farmworkers' involvement and relationship with the United Farm Workers movement and the community.

Alina Méndez (UCSD History) is our 2014-2015 recipient. Her dissertation is entitled: "Land of Sun and Hunger: Labor and Migration in the Imperial-Mexicali Border Region, 1942-1964"

Robert Chlala (USC Sociology) is our recipient of the 2015-2016 fellowship grant for his research with Los Angeles cannabis industry workers. His dissertation entitled "Making Cannabis Work: Transforming Labor, Redefining Politics in Los Angeles 'Gray' Spaces", addresses workers' culture in a relatively new and transforming industry in Southern California.

Preeti Sharma (UCLA Asian American Studies) is awarded our 2016-2017 fellowship grant for her research project entitled "The Thread Between Them: Affective and Intimate Labor in L.A.'s South Asian Threading Salons."

Eric Arce (UCSB Sociology) receives our 2017-2018 fellowship grant for his research project entitled "Que te respeten tu trabajo...": Respect, indignity, and the moral economy of restaurant workers in Los Angeles.

 
 

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